Author Archives: James Coyle

  • 0

Reduce Proxmox LXC Backup Size and Time

Category : How-to

Get Social!

Proxmox backs up guests byte-for-byte in a compressed archive. Looking at LXC backups specifically, the file system is compressed into the target backup file with just a few exceptions – temp files aren’t included. You can also add your own exceptions by editing the vzdump.conf to exclude specific file patterns.

All that said, one of the biggest disk space wasters is the cache directory for apt which caches the installation packages for software you have installed. This can generally be safely removed on internet connected machines which will reduce your overall backup size.

For example, a newly created Debian LXC that’s been recently updated shows a total of 206MB of disk used.

After clearing this with the command apt-get clean we can see the space has mostly been freed.

Considering this whole container is only consuming approximately 1GB of disk space, 200MB is quite significant.

vzdump hooks

Now we can see how much space we can save, we need to make Proxmox issue the apt-get clean command before it creates the backup of our container.

vzdump, the utility which Proxmox uses to perform backups has the ability to call a script for various stages of the backup process – these stages are:

  • backup-start
  • backup-end
  • backup-abort
  • log-end
  • pre-stop
  • pre-restart
  • post-restart

We can use these hooks to run our own commands at any of these points of the backup. For the goal of this blog post, we want to run the apt-get clean command at the point of backup-start.

Create a script on your Proxmox host with the following content:

Now edit your vzdump.conf file and add the following line to point to your new script. Remember to change the location of where your script is – I’ve just saved mine in /root/.

 


  • 0

Gitlab Runner Error: sudo: no tty present and no askpass program specified

Get Social!

After issuing the first build on a dynamically created Container I came across the following build error when running a command with sudo.

The error is caused by trying to run a command with sudo, however the calling user has not been authorised to use sudo. The error isn’t helpful, and doesn’t really spell out where to go, but adding the calling user to the sudoers file will save the day.

Solution

Open up the sudoers file for editing in your favorite editor.

And add your gitlab runner user to the bottom. If you installed your gitlab runner from the official apt repositories then your gitlab-runner process will run under the gitlab-runner user.

Add the following to the bottom of the file:

Retry your build and you should be back in business!

 


  • 0

Scripted Install of Oracle Java 8 on Ubuntu 16.04

Get Social!

Please see Install Oracle Java In Debian/ Ubuntu using apt-get for more information.

 


  • 0

Rename a Proxmox Host

Category : How-to

Get Social!

Renaming a Linux server’s hostname is usually a trivial task, and that’s no Different to a Proxmox server providing it’s not part of a cluster. If your machine is in a cluster then things get a bit more complicated and that’s a blog subject for another day.

For a single node machine it’s simple – Proxmox is Debian under the hood so simply follow the usual Debian process:

Change the hostname file to contain your new hostname

To save having to restart, you can also run the hostname command to implement the change on a running machine. Otherwise you’ll need to reboot your server to pick up the change.

Next, edit your /etc/hostname file and change all occurrences of the old hostname with the new one.


  • 0

Proxmox 5.0 is now available

Category : Tech News

Get Social!

proxmox logo gradToday, the Proxmox VE team have released a new version of Proxmox, incrementing the major version to 5.0!

The new version packs in a raft of new features, the headline being the new Replicated Storage feature which enables batch style synchronisation of local storage volumes across servers.

You can download the ISO from https://www.proxmox.com/en/downloads/item/proxmox-ve-5-0-iso-installer

Highlights of the 5.0 release:

  • Based on Debian Stretch 9.0
  • Kernel 4.10.15
  • QEMU 2.9
  • LXC: update to 2.0.8
  • New asynchronous Storage Replication feature (needs ZFS, technology preview)
  • New/updated LXC templates (Debian, Ubuntu, CentOS, Fedora, OpenSUSE, Arch Linux, Gentoo and Alpine)
  • Updated/improved noVNC console]
  • Ceph v12.1.0 Luminous (technology preview), packaged by Proxmox
  • Live migration with local storage
  • GUI improvements
    • USB und Host PCI address visibility
    • improved bulk and filtering options
  • Improved installation ISO
  • Importing Qemu/KVM_Virtual_Machines#_importing_virtual_machines_from_foreign_hypervisors
  • Improved reference documentation with screenshots
  • Countless bug fixes and package updates

Upgrade

Before updating, make sure all your VM’s have been stopped, both LXC and KVM. Ensure you have the required repository entries for apt. You’ll either need a valid license key or to add the less stable pve-no-subscription repository.

Update your apt for Debian, edit /etc/apt/sources.list and replace it with:

And your Proxmox repository source /etc/apt/sources.list.d/pve-enterprise.list to the below. See Proxmox 3.1 package/ updates manager (this also works for version 5.x) for more information.

Run the below commands on each server in your cluster.

Restart all Proxmox servers to complete the installation.