Category Archives: Docker Compose Files

Storj Storage Node Docker-Compose file

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Storj V3 is now in BETA and recruiting Storage Node operators. Since V3 of Storj, Docker is used exclusively to wrap up creating a new Storage Node into a simple, manageable container.

You’ll need to see the official docs for creating your identity certificates, but when it comes to creating your docker environment it couldn’t be more simple than using docker-compose. If you haven’t got docker-compose installed then check out this blog post.

Create a new folder and a docker-compose.yml with the below content.

mkdir storj
vi storj/docker-compose.yml
version: '3'
services:
  storagenode:
    image: storjlabs/storagenode:beta
    restart: unless-stopped
    ports:
        - 28967:28967
    volumes:
        - ./config/identity:/app/identity
        - ./data:/app/config
    environment:
        - WALLET=0x123456789
        - EMAIL=EMAIL
        - ADDRESS=external.url:28967
        - BANDWIDTH=10TB
        - STORAGE=1TB
        - STORJ_LOG_LEVEL=info

You’ll need to fill out the environment details to match your requirements, especially the WALLET and ADDRESS. You may want to redirect the volume elements to match your environment – the /app/config path should point to the disk that you’d like to use for storage (I know, the name is confusing) and the /app/identity path should point to your Storj identity certificates.

Run docker-compose up -d to fetch the images from the docker hub and create your Storage Node instance.


Docker Compose yml for Gitlab and Gitlab Runner

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version: '3.5'
services:
  gitlab:
    image: gitlab/gitlab-ce:latest
    hostname: www.jamescoyle.net
    restart: unless-stopped
    environment:
      GITLAB_OMNIBUS_CONFIG: |
        gitlab_rails['gitlab_shell_ssh_port'] = 8822
    ports:
      - "8000:80"
      - "8822:8822"
    volumes:
      - ./config/gitlab:/etc/gitlab
      - ./data/gitlab:/var/opt/gitlab
      - ./logs:/var/log/gitlab
    networks:
      - gitlab

  gitlab-runner:
    image: gitlab/gitlab-runner:alpine
    restart: unless-stopped
    depends_on:
      - gitlab
    volumes:
      - ./config/gitlab-runner:/etc/gitlab-runner
      - /var/run/docker.sock:/var/run/docker.sock
    networks:
      - gitlab

networks:
  gitlab:

Create a new directory and save the above file inside it as docker-compose.yml. You’ll need to replace the field hostname with the external URL that you’ll use to access your Gitlab instance.

mkdir gitlab
vi gitlab\docker-compose.yml

Run docker-compose up -d to fetch the images from the docker hub and create your Gitlab instance. You’ll be able to access Gitlab from a browser on port 8000 and the SSH on port 8822.


Docker Compose yml for WordPress

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The below docker-compose yml file will create two Docker containers for running WordPress; a MySQL database and an Apache PHP web server.

version: '3.6'

services:
    db:
        image: mysql:5.7
        container_name: wp_mysql
        volumes:
          - ./data/mysql:/var/lib/mysql
        restart: unless-stopped
        environment:
            MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD: [root password]
            MYSQL_DATABASE: wordpress
            MYSQL_USER: wordpress
            MYSQL_PASSWORD: [wp password]
        networks:
            wordpress:

    wordpress:
        image: wordpress:latest
        container_name: wp_web
        depends_on:
            - db
        ports:
            - 8000:80
        restart: unless-stopped
        environment:
            WORDPRESS_DB_HOST: db:3306
            WORDPRESS_DB_USER: wordpress
            WORDPRESS_DB_NAME: wordpress
            WORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD: [wp password]
        volumes:
            - ./data/wp_content:/var/www/html/wp-content
            - ./config/wordpress/uploads.ini:/usr/local/etc/php/conf.d/uploads.ini
networks:
  wordpress:

Create a new directory and save the above file inside it as docker-compose.yml

mkdir wordpress
vi docker-compose.yml

Run docker-compose up -d to fetch the images from the docker hub and create your WordPress instance. You’ll be able to access WordPress from a browser on port 8000.


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