Set up Fail2ban for Proxmox Web GUI

Set up Fail2ban for Proxmox Web GUI

Get Social!

fail2ban_logoFail2ban is an application that scans log files in real time and bans malicious IP addresses based on a set of rules and filters you can set.

For this blog post, we’re going to look at capturing invalid login attempts to the Proxmox Web GUI and ban any IP addresses from accessing the Web GUI if they fail to authenticate 3 times from the same IP address.

Fail2ban is made up of three main component parts:

  • Filter – a Filter is a pattern or regular expression that we wish to search for in the log files. In our case, we want to search for the words ‘authentication failure’ in the log because that’s what the pvedaemon writes when a failed login attempt occurs.
  • Action – an Action is what we’ll do if the filter is found. What we need to do is ban any IP address where the filter is triggered 3 times.
  • Jail – a Jail in Fail2ban is the glue that holds it all together – this ties a Filter, together with an Action and the relevant log file.

Install Fail2ban

Installing Fail2ban on Debian/ Proxmox is as easy as it gets – just use the apt package manager.

Fail2ban is mostly Python, so it’ll need to be installed on the system or apt-get  will install it as a dependency.

Note: by default Fail2ban will enable itself on SSH connections, blocking invalid IPs after 6 invalid attempts. 

Configure Fail2ban for the Proxmox Web GUI

There are several steps to setting up Fail2ban. As mentioned earlier in the post, we want to ban any users IP address from accessing the Proxmox Web GUI if they have failed to authenticate 3 times. We shouldn’t block them indefinitely because it may be a simple password issue that they can resolve with the account administrator. We’ll configure Fail2ban to ban failed attempts for an hour.

Because banning a user after 3 invalid attempts is a fairly basic thing in the world of Fail2ban, we won’t need to create an Action as listed above. We’ll need to create a Jail and a Filter.

The Jail

A Jail in Fail2ban is the core configuration that  combines a Filter, an Action (although this may be default Fail2ban behaviour) and a log file.

The default configuration for Fail2ban is found in /etc/fail2ban/jail.conf and contains many predefined entries for common processes such as FTP and Apache. We shouldn’t edit this file directly when adding new entries, instead, we should create the below file which will be used to override the default jail.conf.

Add the following (this file may not already exist):

The above entry has set a ruleset name of proxmox-web-gui, and the following:

  • enabled – this simply states that this ruleset is active.
  • port – set sthe port that any bans should act on
  • filter – this sets the file name of the filter that we’ll use to detect any login failures. More about this in the next section.
  • logpath – the name or pattern (for example /var/log/apache/*.log) of the log to monitor for the failed logins. This is the file that the above filter will work on.
  • maxretry – this is how many times should the filter detect a problem before starting the ban.
  • bantime – this is how long, in minutes, that the ban be in effect for.

The Filter

Now that we have specified the log file to look in we need to specify how to find the event we need to look for. For our example, Proxmox writes a specific string each time a failed login occurs which looks like the belew:

Our Filter, therefore, needs to look for this text and pull out the IP address.

Create a Filter file called proxmox-web-gui.conf in /etc/fail2ban/filter.d/.

Add the following:

This will match the text that Proxmox writes to the daemon.log file when a failed login is detected. It’s got a Fail2ban specific keyword <HOST> which is what’s used to indicate to Fail2ban where the offending IP address is in the log entry. Fail2ban can then block this IP address as indicated in our Jail file.

Testing Fail2ban Filters

Fail2ban provides a nice little utility to test your Filter definitions to make sure they are working as you intend. First things first – we need an entry in our log file for an invalid login attempt. Go to your Proxmox Web GUI and enter some invalid login credentials.

The command to use is fail2ban-regex which has two parameters; the log file location and the Filter location.

An example of the output is below. The text Success, the total number of match is 1 states that there is one match in the log for our pattern in the proxmox-web-gui.conf file.

Restart fail2ban for the new Jail to be loaded.

To check your new Jail has been loaded, run the following command and look for the proxmox-web-gui Jail name next to Jail List.

Try to log into the Proxmox Web GUI with an incorrect user 3 and see your IP address appear in the Currently banned section.

 


Related posts:


6 Comments

Jeff

19-Oct-2015 at 7:31 pm

This method doesn’t work when using your nginx webui… You will ban you own ip LOL

    james.coyle

    20-Oct-2015 at 7:11 am

    Hi Jeff, This is designed to be used with the default built in web server. YMMV with anything else.

Jeff

20-Oct-2015 at 1:38 pm

Is there a way to make this work with nginx reverse proxy without banning your own IP lol. Because using nginx reverse proxy to bring proxmox by example on port 443 makes the webui easier to reach to everyone, and it`s not really secure if you don`t have any kind of bruteforce mechanism.

jack

31-Mar-2016 at 3:41 pm

hi nice idea
and i was searching for something like this

debian wheezy sorry to say it does not work
no webgui
install guide incpmplete you forgot to restart fail2ban after:
[Definition]
failregex = pvedaemon\[[0-9]+\]: authentication failure; rhost= user=.* msg=.*

    james.coyle

    31-Mar-2016 at 3:58 pm

    The post does state ‘Restart fail2ban for the new Jail to be loaded.’ and include the steps on how to do that.

Leave a Reply

Visit our advertisers

Search

Quick Poll

Do you use ZFS on Linux?

Visit our advertisers